Posted in grammar schools, Uncategorized

Exclusive: an interview with Angela Rayner

Part one: grammar schools and social mobility

Last week we interviewed Shadow Education Secretary Angela Rayner, and asked her opinion regarding the government’s Green Paper. Continue reading “Exclusive: an interview with Angela Rayner”

Advertisements
Posted in mental health, Uncategorized

How to improve mental health in your school

Last week, in a speech at the Charity Commission, Prime Minister Theresa May announced a new approach to tackling mental health.

There is no denying that the speech was a breakthrough for mental health sufferers and activists – for the first time in history, the UK has a government seemingly committed to taking mental health seriously, to breaking the stigma and silence around the subject by bringing it the forefront of public discourse.

However, scepticism has been aroused – political rhetoric is, after all, no substitute for concrete action.

We interviewed John Tomsett, headteacher at Huntington School in York and user of TheSchoolBus. Continue reading “How to improve mental health in your school”

Posted in Assessment, research, SEND, Uncategorized

Dyslexia: overlooked and left behind?

Every year, SATs results and other national testing shows that too many children and young people are not meeting expected levels in literacy, with 1 in 5 children leaving primary school below the national expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics.[1]

If you cannot learn to read, you cannot read to learn, and too many children are unable to access the curriculum due to poor reading skills. It is these children who then become disengaged and leave school with few, or no qualifications, resulting in significantly reduced opportunities. Continue reading “Dyslexia: overlooked and left behind?”

Posted in curriculum, education, Government stragegy, parents, Uncategorized

Can grammar schools really improve social mobility?

rope pixabay.jpg
Image credit: Pixabay

Within hours of its publication on 12 September 2016, the DfE’s consultation document ‘Schools that work for everyone’ was at the centre of a political storm regarding its aims to “relax the restrictions on selective education”.

The opening sentence of the Green Paper sets out “the government’s ambition to create an education system that extends opportunity to everyone, not just the privileged few”. Can the grammar school renaissance really improve social mobility for all? Continue reading “Can grammar schools really improve social mobility?”

Posted in education, parents, policy, schools, Secondary, Uncategorized

The rise of free schools?

Road sign to  education and future
Image credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Could Theresa May’s government herald the rise of free schools and a return to widespread selective education?

Since the Prime Minister’s inaugural speech, delivered outside Downing Street on 13 July 2016, speculation in relation to the role of free schools and the return of grammar schools has swept through the sector, prompting emotive statements such as: “If you’re a white, working-class boy, you’re less likely than anybody else in Britain to go to university. If you’re at a state school, you’re less likely to reach the top professions than if you’re educated privately”, it is unsurprising. Continue reading “The rise of free schools?”