Posted in governors, Uncategorized

Should governors be striking a deal?

Last week, governors in West Sussex went on strike in protest of the lack of funding for schools. This is the first action of its kind, as governor volunteers withdrew their support to schools for the day.

We contacted governors at Upper Beeding Primary School after they released a statement to parents outlining the funding issue.

We asked what measures the governing board had put in place to try and avoid getting to strike action. Continue reading “Should governors be striking a deal?”

Posted in teaching, Uncategorized

Beating funding cuts: decreasing workload and boosting morale

There is so much work and preparation that goes into being a teacher – as a school leader, you see what your teachers have to offer on a daily basis – their relationships with pupils and families, their commitments toward improving their practice, and the teamwork they demonstrate with their colleagues.

According to data released by the Office for National Statistics, the suicide rate of primary school teachers in England is nearly double the national average. Figures reveal that, between 2011 and 2015, the risk of suicide among primary and nursery school teachers was 42 percent higher than that of the broader population of England.

The startling figures have been published amid warnings that increasing pressures in the profession have made teaching “one of the most highly stressed occupations in the country today”, with a number of former and current teachers reporting that unmanageable workloads have impacted negatively on their mental health.

It is vital that you have a comprehensive, whole-school approach to mental health and emotional wellbeing, to ensure that staff and pupils are happy and safe. The link between low morale and poor teacher retention is well documented, and can severely impact on pupil behaviour and attainment.

You may not be able to shield staff from the uncertainty created by continual government reforms and budget restraints, but you can introduce low-cost and easy-to-implement strategies. Continue reading “Beating funding cuts: decreasing workload and boosting morale”

Posted in mental health, suicide, Uncategorized

13 Reasons Why – shocked? So were we.

Netflix’s controversial suicide drama has sparked debate following its arrival on the streaming service in March.

The debate surrounding 13 Reasons Why, and whether it deals with the subject of teen suicide tactfully, is continuing as schools in the USA are now issuing letters to parents warning them about the drama.

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The adaptation of Jay Asher’s 2007 novel, Thirteen Reasons Why, follows a group of 12 high-school pupils as they piece together a story described on a series of tapes left for them from their classmate, Hannah Baker, who has committed suicide. Continue reading “13 Reasons Why – shocked? So were we.”

Posted in Funding, school business management, Uncategorized

Remaining an effective SBM during a funding crisis

The education landscape is forever changing – with teacher workload dominating the news, alongside the proposed plans of the national funding formula, we understand that school business managers (SBMs) are feeling the pressure.

Not only do you have to deal with the government agenda and ever-changing policies at a fast pace, but your role is constantly evolving.

So, how can SBMs ensure they are working effectively, and that their school is financially efficient, in the face of financial cuts?

Created in collaboration with Caroline Collins, Head of School Business at Miles Coverdale Primary School, Fellow of NASBM and Specialist Leader of Education, here are some key tips to help you during this uncertain time. Continue reading “Remaining an effective SBM during a funding crisis”

Posted in sex and relationship education, Uncategorized

A Periodic Dilemma

No other area of school life relies on free samples or branded teaching resources to assist its pupils with their day-to-day lives. So why, when it comes to menstruation, have we ceded?

The Guardian reported last month that “girls from low-income families across England are struggling to afford sanitary protection, with many teachers buying tampons for their pupils or seeking help with supplies from charities and voluntary groups”.

This revelation is alarming, but consistent with the rising levels of child poverty in the country. But with our current, divisive Brexit fixation, the situation could deteriorate further. Continue reading “A Periodic Dilemma”

Posted in Funding, Uncategorized

A fairer funding formula?

Funding for schools is an issue at the forefront of education sector reforms – having first been announced in March 2016 in the White Paper ‘Educational Excellence Everywhere’, on 13 December 2016 the government announced stage two of its consultation plans to design and implement a new way of funding for schools.

If you have ever attempted to unpick and understand the formula used by LAs to fund schools, you will have no doubt been left just as confused and confounded as you were when you started. Many have argued that the allocation of funding to schools is based on a formula that is too historic and outdated to meet the needs of any pupils in our schools today. Continue reading “A fairer funding formula?”